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Why You Should Be Cautious About How You Share Files

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Why You Should Be Cautious About How You Share Files

The cloud lets your business share files easily and efficiently, but regardless of how useful this feature is, you need to make sure that your team understands how and why they’re given access to certain files. Giving the freedom to share files is great, but it can quickly become a hindrance when you have inexperienced users doing the sharing. Be sure to take these three risks into account before handing over the keys to your business’s file sharing.

Files Shared to Accounts With Poor Password Security

Most, if not all cloud services provide each individual user with their own account for file storage and whatnot. These accounts are all protected by a specific password, which is almost always decided by the user. The unfortunate part of this is that the password is basically all that stands between the hacker and the contents of the account, as well as any files shared with that account. Passwords made without concern for account security could have the potential to leave your data vulnerable. There’s no guarantee that the account you’re sharing files with is using a complex password.

The security of data stored in a cloud solution is only as strong as the weakest link. Business owners need to ensure that each password used by employees, and anyone who accessed company data, is strong.

Files Shared with Unauthorized Hardware

If you have employees that work remotely, you need to consider that these employees might be using older technology that may not be cleared with IT. Any device that’s accessing company data can be considered an access point. Unapproved devices could potentially be infected by malware or outdated devices may not have proper security updates and patches.

Another example is an employee who travels a lot using a public Wi-Fi connection, or a public PC in a local library or a hotel lobby. If these devices are being used to send and receive files with the cloud, this data could be put at risk. Implementing a solid Bring Your Own Device policy and educating your staff on security best practices will help ensure that this doesn’t happen.

The Security of the Cloud Service Provider Itself

You may be taking advantage of top-tier security solutions for your in-house network, but your cloud service provider may not have taken the same measures to protect your data. Whatever your chosen cloud service is, make sure that it’s secure and universal throughout your company, and that it’s the standard way of sharing and storing files for your business. The last thing you want is for your employees to use an unapproved cloud sharing solution that your business has no control over.

By keeping these risks in mind, your can share files with confidence. For more information on how to achieve such a feat, Quikteks can help. To learn more, reach out to us at (973) 882-4644.